Thursday, June 17, 2010

Pendaftaran dibuka sepanjang tahun!!!

Jadual kelas adalah seperti berikut:-

Tempat : Kola Renang Kelab Golf DANAU, UKM Bangi.
Hari : Setiap Sabtu
Masa : 3-4 ptg (kanak-kanak 5&6 tahun)
: 4-5 petang (murid sekolah 7-17tahun)*
: 5-6 petang (dewasa lelaki & wanita)*

* lelaki & wanita diasingkan.

Utk maklumat lanjut & terkini, sila hubungi kami melalui telefon @ email kami di

Thursday, November 19, 2009


Program Renang Cuti Sekolah..

1) Renang Intensif - Learn 2 Swim in 6 Days

Mulai 21/11/2009 - 24/12/2009
Setiap Selasa - Sabtu
9.00pg - 11.00pg kecuali Sabtu 4.00ptg - 5.00ptg

2) Life Saving Course
(dengan kerjasama Persatuan Penyelamat Malaysia)
1 Disember 2009 - 17 Disember 2009
Setiap Selasa - Sabtu
9.00pg - 11.00pg kecuali Sabtu 4.00ptg - 5.00ptg
14 tahun-dewasa

Utk maklumat lanjut sila hubungi kami di 019-2587456 (Dr.Idris), 016-2810127 (Pn. Nazaha)

Thursday, June 11, 2009


We are now open for new intake for the secondhalf of the year - (JUNE 2009) session. Contact us now for the latest details...

Thank you..

Wednesday, February 18, 2009

How to Teach a Child to Blow Bubbles While Swimming

Knowing how to blow bubbles is the first step in teaching children swimming. But it's a scary step for many children and if you don't teach them correctly, you can traumatize your child, scaring them away from learning how to swim.


Get your child into the water and let them splash around a little bit so they're comfortable in the water. If they're not comfortable or are scared in the water, wait a little longer before teaching them to blow bubbles.

Hold your finger or have your child hold their finger up in front of their face.

Make your child blow onto their finger, as if they're blowing out a birthday candle or a dandelion. Feel free to be as silly as your child needs during this step.

Encourage your child to put their mouth into the water and have them blow again. Laugh, applaud, and point out the silly bubbles your child is making.

Have your child put their mouth and nose into the water and have them blow again, if they're comfortable with this step.

Persuade your child to put their entire face into the pool, if they're comfortable doing this. Have them blow bubbles again. Once your child has put their face into the pool, encourage them to put their whole head under water and blow bubbles.

Tips & Warnings

  • It may take several days or even weeks before your child will put their whole head under water and blow bubbles.
  • Demonstrate how to blow bubbles underwater and how to put a face under water.
  • Never force your child to put their head or face into the water as this could traumatize them.
By eHow Sports & Fitness Editor

Thursday, January 15, 2009

Water Safety : Safety 1st

Swimming Smarts

"Buddy up!" That's what swimming instructors say. Always swim with a partner, every time — whether you're swimming in a backyard pool or in a lake. Even experienced swimmers can become tired or get muscle cramps, which might make it difficult to get out of the water. When people swim together, they can help each other or go for help in case of an emergency.

Get skilled. Speaking of emergencies, it's good to be prepared. Learning some life-saving techniques, such as CPR and rescue techniques, can help you save a life. A number of organizations offer free classes for both beginning and experienced swimmers and boaters. Check with your YMCA or YWCA, local hospital, or chapter of the Red Cross.

Know your limits. Swimming can be a lot of fun — and you might want to stay in the water as long as possible. If you're not a good swimmer or you're just learning to swim, don't go in water that's so deep you can't touch the bottom and don't try to keep up with skilled swimmers. That can be hard, especially when your friends are challenging you — but it's a pretty sure bet they'd rather have you safe and alive.

If you are a good swimmer and have had lessons, keep an eye on friends who aren't as comfortable or as skilled as you are. If it seems like they (or you) are getting tired or a little uneasy, suggest that you take a break from swimming for a while.

Swim in safe areas only. It's a good idea to swim only in places that are supervised by a lifeguard. No one can anticipate changing ocean currents, riptides, sudden storms, or other hidden dangers. In the event that something does go wrong, lifeguards are trained in rescue techniques.

Swimming in an open body of water (like a river, lake, or ocean) is different from swimming in a pool. You need more energy to handle the currents and other conditions in the open water.

If you do find yourself caught in a current, don't panic and don't fight the current. Swim with the current, gradually trying to make your way back to shore as you do so. Even a very good swimmer who tries to swim against a strong current will get worn out. If you're going to be swimming in an open body of water, it's a great idea to take swimming lessons that provide you with tips on handling unexpected hazards.

Some areas with extremely strong currents are off limits when it comes to swimming. Do your research so you know where not to swim.

Be careful about diving. Diving injuries can cause permanent spinal cord damage, paralysis, and in some cases even death. Protect yourself by only diving in areas that are known to be safe, such as the deep end of a supervised pool. If an area is posted with "No Diving" or "No Swimming" signs, pay attention to them. A "No Diving" sign means the water isn't safe for a head-first entry. Even if you plan to jump in feet first, check the water's depth before you leap to make sure there are no hidden rocks or other hazards. Lakes or rivers can be cloudy and hazards may be hard to see.

Watch the sun. Sun reflecting off the water or off sand can intensify the burning rays. You might not feel sunburned when the water feels cool and refreshing, but the pain will catch up with you later — so remember to reapply sunscreen frequently and cover up much of the time.

Drink plenty of fluids. It's easy to get dehydrated in the sun, particularly if you're active and sweating. Keep up with fluids — particularly water — to prevent dehydration. Dizziness, feeling lightheaded, or nausea can be signs of dehydration and overheating.

Getting too cool. Speaking of temperature, it's possible to get too cool. How? Staying in very cool water for long periods can lower your body temperature. A temperature of 70° Fahrenheit (20° Celsius) is positively balmy on land, but did you know that water below 70° Fahrenheit will feel cold to most swimmers? Your body temperature drops far more quickly in water than it does on land. And if you're swimming, you're using energy and losing body heat even faster than if you were keeping still. Monitor yourself when swimming in cold water and stay close to shore. If feel your body start to shiver or your muscles cramp up, get out of the water quickly; it doesn't take long for hypothermia to set in.

Alcohol and water never mix. Alcohol is involved in numerous water-related injuries and up to half of all water-related deaths. The statistics for teenage guys are particularly scary: One half of all adolescent male drownings are tied to alcohol use.

At the Water Park

OK, so you do more splashing than swimming, but it's just as important to know your skill level at the water park as it is at the pool. Take a moment to read warnings and other signs. And make sure you do slide runs feet first or you'll put yourself at risk for a ride that's a lot less fun — one to your doctor or dentist.

Boating Safety

More people die in boating accidents every year than in airplane crashes or train wrecks, but a little common sense can make boating both enjoyable and safe. If you are going to go boating, make sure the captain or person handling the boat is experienced and competent.

Alcohol and water still don't mix. One third of boating deaths are alcohol related. Alcohol distorts a person's judgment no matter where they are — but that distortion is even greater on the water. The U.S. Coast Guard warns people about a condition called boater's fatigue, which means that the wind, noise, heat, and vibration of the boat all combine to wear you down when you're on the water.

Because there are no road signs or lane markers on the water and the weather can be unpredictable, it's important to be able to think quickly and react well under pressure. If you're drinking, this can be almost impossible.

Personal flotation devices. It's always a good idea for everyone on the boat to wear a Coast Guard-approved life jacket, whether the boat is a large speedboat or a canoe — and whether you're a good swimmer or not. Wearing a life jacket (also known as a personal flotation device, or PFD) is the law in some states for certain age groups, and you could face a stiff penalty for breaking it. Your state may also require that you wear an approved life jacket for water skiing and other on-water activities. Wearing a PFD is like wearing a helmet while biking. It may take a few minutes to get used to it, but it definitely can be a lifesaver. Don't leave land without it.

Stay in touch. Before going out on a boat, let somebody on land know where you are going and about how long you'll be out. That way, if you do get into trouble, someone will have an idea of where to look for you. If you're going to be on the water for a long time, it's a good idea to have a radio with you so you can check the weather reports. Water conducts electricity, so if you hear a storm warning, get off the water as quickly as you can.

Jet skis. If you're using jet skis or personal watercraft, follow the same rules as you do for boating. You should also check out the laws in your area governing the use of personal watercraft. Some states won't allow people under a certain age to operate these devices; others require you to take a course or pass a test before you can ride one.

Now Have Fun!

The pool and the beach are great places to learn new skills, socialize, and check out everyone's new bathing suit. So don't let paying attention to safety turn you off. Being prepared will make you feel more comfortable and in charge.

Tuesday, January 13, 2009

Kepentingan Berenang Untuk Kanak-Kanak di Negara Barat

Kanak-kanak memang secara semulajadinya sangat suka bermain air. Masalahnya adalah mereka tidak tahu air berbahaya jika tidak tahu menghadapi situasi cemas, sekiranya ia berlaku. Kejadian yang tidak diingini selalunya berlaku diluar kawalan ibubapa. Oleh itu, seawal 4 atau 5 tahun, kanak-kanak digalakkan mengikuti kelas water safety dan kelas berenang secara formal.

Di Sweden, Denmark, dan Finland, kurikulum untuk gred lima menyatakan bahawa semua kanak-kanak harus belajar berenang serta bagaimana menangani kecemasan di dalam air. Seringnya, mereka dikehendaki mencapai keupayaan untuk berenang 200 meter (220 ela) — dengan sekurang-kurangnya 50 meter (55 ela) secara berbaring — selepas jatuh ke dalam air yang dalam, dengan kepala mereka di dalam air. Walaupun lebih kurang 95 peratus daripada kanak-kanak sekolah Sweden tahu bagaimana berenang, mati lemas masih merupakan punca kematian yang ketiga paling umum antara kanak-kanak.

Di kedua-dua Belanda dan Belgium, latihan renang semasa bersekolah (schoolzwemmen, renang sekolah) disokong oleh kerajaan. Kebanyakan sekolah memberikan latihan renang. Terdapat tradisi lama latihan renang di Belanda, dengan istilah gaya dada dalam bahasa Belanda membawa pengertian harfiah, "gaya sekolah" (schoolslag ).

Di banyak tempat, latihan renang diberikan oleh kolam renang tempatan yang dikendalikan oleh kedua-dua pihak berkuasa tempatan serta syarikat kegiatan senggang swasta. Banyak sekolah juga memasukkan latihan renang ke dalam kurikulum pendidikan jasmani mereka yang diberikan, baik di dalam kolam sekolah sendiri mahupun di kolam renang awam yang terdekat.

Di United Kingdom, "Skim Tambahan" memerlukan kanak-kanak sekolah yang masih tidak berupaya berenang ketika mencapai umur 11 tahun diberikan latihan harian intensif. Mereka yang tidak berupaya berenang 25 meter sebagaimana yang dikehendaki oleh piawai Kurikulum Negara Great Britain ketika menamatkan sekolah rendah akan diberikan latihan setengah jam setiap hari selama dua minggu pada penggal sekolah.

Di Kanada, terdapat seruan untuk memasuki renang ke dalam kurikulum sekolah kerajaan.

5 sebab mengapa kita perlu belajar berenang

1. Satu kemahiran hidup yang penting terutamanya jika berdepan dengan kecemasan di dalam air.
2. Sejenis sukan yang berisiko rendah dan amat digalakkan oleh pakar prubatan bagi mereka yang menghadapi masalah sakit belakang dan Lelah (Athsma).
3. Merupakan salah satu sunnah yang dituntut dalam islam selain daripada berkuda dan memanah.
4. Asas kepada pelbagai sukan air dan aktiviti riadah air seperti scuba diving dan snorkelling.
5. Mudah, murah dan boleh dilakukan dimana-mana dan dinikmati bersama keluarga seperti di pantai, sungai, tasik, kolam renang dan di taman tema air.